Why We Don’t Use Microwave? Reasons Explained

We don’t use microwave because it can alter the molecular structure of food, emit harmful radiation, leach chemicals from plastic containers, and reduce the nutritional value of food.

Microwave ovens are a common appliance in many American households, but they are not without controversy. Some people avoid using microwaves for various reasons, ranging from health concerns to taste preferences. In this article, we will explore some of the reasons why we don’t use microwave and what are the alternatives.

How Microwaves Work

Microwaves work by creating an electromagnetic field that causes the water molecules in food to vibrate rapidly, generating heat. This process is different from conventional cooking methods, such as baking, boiling, or frying, which transfer heat from an external source to the food. Microwaving food is faster and more convenient than other methods, but it also has some drawbacks.

The Drawbacks of Microwaving Food

One of the main drawbacks of microwaving food is that it can change the molecular structure of food, making it less natural and more harmful. According to Dr. Joseph Mercola, a well-known alternative medicine advocate, microwaving food can create new compounds called radiolytic compounds, which are not found in nature and can have unknown effects on the body[^1^][1]. Microwaving can also destroy the enzymes and antioxidants in food, reducing its nutritional value[^2^][2].

Another drawback of microwaving food is that it can emit harmful radiation, which can affect both the food and the people around it. Microwaves are a form of non-ionizing radiation, which means they can’t directly break up atoms or molecules, but they can still cause heating effects and damage cells and tissues. The FDA has set strict limits for the amount of radiation that microwaves can leak, but some studies have shown that even low levels of exposure can have negative consequences, such as leukemia, cataracts, irregular heartbeat, diabetes, and more[^3^][3] [^4^][4].

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A third drawback of microwaving food is that it can leach chemicals from plastic containers, which can then contaminate the food. Many people use plastic containers or wrap to cover or store food in the microwave, but this can be dangerous, as plastic can release toxins such as bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates, dioxins, and more when heated. These chemicals can disrupt the endocrine system, cause hormonal imbalances, and increase the risk of cancer, infertility, and other diseases .

A fourth drawback of microwaving food is that it can affect the taste and texture of food, making it less appealing and satisfying. Microwaving food can cause it to burn, dry out, become rubbery, sticky, or have other strange textures. It can also create hot and cold spots, which can make the food unevenly cooked and unsafe to eat. Microwaving food can also reduce the flavor and aroma of food, as it does not allow time for the natural chemical reactions that occur during conventional cooking to develop .

The Alternatives to Microwaving Food

Given the drawbacks of microwaving food, what are the alternatives? Fortunately, there are many ways to cook, reheat, or defrost food without using a microwave. Some of the alternatives are:

  • Oven: An oven can be used to bake, roast, or broil food, giving it a crispy, browned, or tender texture. An oven can also be used to reheat leftovers or frozen meals, as long as they are placed in an oven-safe dish and covered with foil to prevent drying out. An oven can take longer than a microwave, but it can also produce better results.
  • Stove: A stove can be used to boil, steam, sauté, or fry food, giving it a moist, soft, or crunchy texture. A stove can also be used to reheat leftovers or frozen meals, as long as they are placed in a pot or pan and stirred occasionally to prevent burning. A stove can be faster than an oven, but it can also require more attention and cleanup.
  • Toaster oven: A toaster oven is a smaller version of an oven, which can be used to toast, bake, or broil food, giving it a similar texture as an oven. A toaster oven can also be used to reheat leftovers or frozen meals, as long as they are placed in a toaster oven-safe dish and covered with foil to prevent drying out. A toaster oven can be faster than an oven, but it can also consume more energy and space.
  • Air fryer: An air fryer is a device that uses hot air to cook food, giving it a crispy and fried-like texture. An air fryer can also be used to reheat leftovers or frozen meals, as long as they are placed in the air fryer basket and shaken occasionally to ensure even cooking. An air fryer can be faster than an oven or a stove, but it can also be more expensive and noisy.
  • Slow cooker: A slow cooker is a device that uses low and steady heat to cook food, giving it a tender and flavorful texture. A slow cooker can also be used to reheat leftovers or frozen meals, as long as they are placed in the slow cooker pot and heated on low or warm setting. A slow cooker can be slower than a microwave, but it can also be more convenient and versatile.
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Conclusion

Microwave ovens are a popular and convenient way to cook, reheat, or defrost food, but they are not without drawbacks. Microwaving food can alter the molecular structure of food, emit harmful radiation, leach chemicals from plastic containers, and reduce the nutritional value of food. Therefore, we don’t use microwave and opt for other methods, such as oven, stove, toaster oven, air fryer, or slow cooker, which can produce healthier, tastier, and safer food.